Writing

Character Spotlight: Samantha Felding

Posted On February 2, 2019 at 9:01 pm by / No Comments

Samantha Felding.

  • Thirty something
  • Married to Mitchell Felding (10 years.)
  • High School Educator
  • Self – Motivated
  • High Achiever
  • Catholic

Sam is a highly trustworthy, dependable woman. She’s personable and friendly to all.

Samantha remembers names, birthdays and even reads the obituaries in case one someone she knows passes away. Cards are frequently sent via regular post. Handwritten wishes and sympathies always accompany them.

Some say she’s old before her time – too empathetic, too organized and disciplined to be a product of her generation.

She’d rather write on paper than use an electronic device to keep notes and send letters.

There are calendars in every room of her home and clocks in key areas so she can measure her productivity. Not one second of her day is wasted.

She has to be this organized. She’s a high-school teacher and very good at it. Her recent promotion was a result of her ongoing officiousness. She deserves the new job appointment. Successful teaching requires good planning and teachers who know to get things done.

There are day planners on her desk, monthly planners on the wall and diaries throughout her home. If she’s to have a successful work / life balance, everything must be planned and factored-in to make it happen.

Nothing happens by accident. Winging-it is an offensive couple of words.

She’s intelligent, strong and independent – a modern woman with strong but quiet feminist values.

On the surface, she’s gracious. A warm smile calms strangers and puts them at ease. She’ll talk to almost anyone about almost anything and look them in the eye when she does it. There is no one Sam can’t reach out and touch.

She got those traits from her mother – and living by Jesus’s example.

Unless you asked, you’d never know she’s a Christian. There are signs that show it but nothing that’s obvious. She’d rather you judge her by her actions, not religion or sex. Religion is deeply personal to Sam. It’s not something to force upon another.

Deep on the inside, Sam’s everything her outer-self isn’t.

She’s a ball of tightly wound anxiety. It makes her doubt every word, every action. It keeps asking one question over and over: ‘Am I doing enough for God?’

There’s a lot to live up to. She doesn’t want to disappoint anyone, least of all Him.

It’s as if her mind runs a thousand ‘what if’ scenarios per second and micro-manages each one of them independently as they get closer to the present.

There’s something to worry over for every moment of the day.

It could be as little as putting the wrong type of sugar into the sugar bowl when visitors arrive unannounced.

Is the coffee too hot, or not hot enough? What if the discussion is too political or isn’t high-brow enough? Should she offer tea instead?

It’s difficult to be Sam.

She expects catastrophes but does her best to avert them by pre-planning and having contingencies at-the-ready should the worst happen.

There’s a proper way to do things but rescue missions are at-the-ready should propriety be insufficient.

Needless to say, her work ethic prohibits spontaneity. Husband Mitchell often has to negotiate with Sam to be with her.

Free time is wasteful, unproductive…. and sex is such a frivolous activity anyway.

Romance rarely makes it into Sam’s diaries.

This explains why her husband has been spending more time away from home – it gives Sam more time to achieve other things and please God. His new hobby alleviates pressure.

Samantha’s a young woman with old Catholic heart and spirit. All her marriage needs to thrive is prayer and Faith.

Sam and Mitchell haven’t any children.

It’s been a year since Sam and Mitchell decided to plan to have a child and about two years since they were intimate with each other. Sam believes God will provide the answers. Mitchell waits to be allocated time in Sam’s well-thumbed, dog-eared diaries to play his part.
 
You could say their relationship is platonic. Counselor Tony Brindell is helping them work on their marriage.

Samantha Felding’s part in SEETHINGS is to antagonize the narrative at key times when it the reader needs to be shaken with frustration. Despite her redeeming qualities, she’s inadvertently poisoning her marriage by actively neglecting it.

Mitchell tries his best – going to great lengths to prove his love but loses out to more important items listed in those planners and diaries of hers.

Michael


 

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